Catholic Worker and the origin of Catholic radicalism in America by Mel W. Piehl

Cover of: Catholic Worker and the origin of Catholic radicalism in America | Mel W. Piehl

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Written in English

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  • Catholic Worker Movement.

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Book details

Statementby Mel Piehl.
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 331 leaves
Number of Pages331
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18255043M

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: Breaking Bread: The Catholic Worker and the Origin of Catholic Radicalism in America (Religion & American Culture) (): Piehl, Mel: BooksCited by: A thoughtful and readable history of just want the subtitle promises -- "The Catholic Worker and the Origin of Catholic Radicalism in America." I found Piehl to be less sympathetic to Peter Maurin than several of the other works on the Catholic Worker I've recently read.4/5.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video An illustration of an audio speaker. the Catholic Worker and the origin of Catholic radicalism in America Item Preview remove-circle the Catholic Worker and the origin of Catholic radicalism in America by Piehl, : The following yearsaw the and theOriginof of publication BreakingBread: The CatholicWorker Catholic Radicalism in America by Mel Piehl, the first book-length in of treatment the Worker all itsdimensions.

in in and in influence, a is The Worker movement, ideology, practice, Piehl has done a creditable of unravjob highly complexphenomenon. and. "breaking bread.

the catholic worker and the origin of catholic radicalism in america. tuscaloosa: university of alabama press XVI, p." published on by De Gruyter. Get print book. No eBook available. ; Breaking Bread: The Catholic Worker and the Origin of Catholic Radicalism in America.

Mel Piehl. University of Alabama Press, - History - pages. 0 Reviews. What people are saying - Write a review. We haven't found any reviews in the usual places. The Catholic Worker and the Origin. Catholic Worker Movement During its heyday in the late s and early s, the Chicago Catholic Worker was the most significant offshoot of Dorothy Day's group in New York City.

It ran houses of hospitality (St. Joseph's, the longest lasting and most important, opened in ) where members lived and practiced works of mercy. The Catholic Worker movement can reclaim its radical heritage only through a radical return to its roots, that is, through a return to the vision of its founders, Day and Maurin.

Such a re-radicalization would have to include two key elements: a reaffirmation of Catholic identity and a reappraisal of how best to serve today’s laboring poor.

Dorothy Day, cofounder of the Catholic Worker Movement, lifelong radical and anarchist, and prolific journalist, died on Novem. This book is essential reading for understanding the legacy behind the Catholic Worker Movement. The founders of the movement, Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin met during the Great Depression in Their collaboration sparked something in the Church that has been both an inspiration and a reproach to American Catholicism.

Dorothy Day is already a cultural icon.5/5(1). The definitive edition of Catholic Worker cofounder Peter Maurin's Easy Essays, including 74 previously unpublished works Although Peter Maurin is well known among people connected to the Catholic Worker movement, his Catholic Worker co-founder and mentee Dorothy Day largely overshadowed him.

Maurin was never the charismatic leader that Day was, and some Workers found his. History. The Catholic Worker Movement started with the Catholic Worker newspaper, created by Dorothy Day to advance Catholic social teaching and stake out a neutral, Christian pacifist position in the war-torn s.

Day attempted to put her words from the Catholic Worker into action through "houses of hospitality" and then through a series of farms for people to live together on communes. Catholic Worker- Internet Archive- from The Christian Radical, vol 1 Book/Journal Source(s) Reid, Daniel, Robert Linder, Bruce Shelley, and Harry Stout, Dictionary of Christianity in America.

Downers Grove, IL. Web Page Contributor Benjamin T. Gurrentz Affliated with: Pennsylvania State University, Ph.D. in Catholic Worker and the origin of Catholic radicalism in America book.

Breaking bread: the Catholic Worker and the origin of Catholic radicalism in America by Mel Piehl (Book); A Revolution of the heart: essays on the Catholic worker (Book); Beyond charismatic leadership: the New York Catholic Worker Movement by Michele Teresa Aronica (Book).

The Bloomington Catholic Worker is a community in the tradition of the Catholic Worker movement. The Catholic Worker movement lives the vision of Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin, who believed that a peaceable revolution would result if people imitated Jesus Christ's nonviolence, voluntary poverty, and radical hospitality.

The BCW/CR is an ecumenical Christian intentional. The book provides details of how Day shared public platforms with high profile Communists including Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, a paid official of the CPUSA (and later its first woman Chairman), took an active part in an array of Communist-led strikes during the s and ‘40s and used her newspaper, the Catholic Worker (CW), of which she was.

Radical Catholic Boomers Are Rising Up. The Catholic Worker Movement and Plowshares belong to a long tradition of radical religious activism in the U.S. Now, in response to the protests spreading across the country, they’re reckoning.

This book is essential reading for understanding the legacy behind the Catholic Worker Movement. The founders of the movement, Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin met during the Great Depression in Their collaboration sparked something in the Church that has been both an inspiration and a reproach to American s: The Catholic Worker employs subsistence and resistance economic strategies to survive, but also protest a capitalist system.

Householding, originally a concept developed by Karl Polanyi, illustrates an economic system that allows marginalized organizations to survive within a capitalistic system through innovative techniques such as sharing, pooling of resources and living close to poverty.

Catholic Worker Movement, Roman Catholic lay movement in the United States and Canada, emphasizing personal reform, radical agrarianism, absolute pacifism, and the personal practice of the principles in Jesus’ Sermon on the movement was founded in by Dorothy Day (–) at the instigation of Peter Maurin (–), a self-described peasant-philosopher and.

The first full authoritative biography of Dorothy Day, American icon, radical pacifist, Catholic convert, and activist whom Pope Francis I compared to Martin Luther King Jr.

and Abraham Lincoln. After a middle-class Republican childhood and a few years as a Communist sympathizer, Dorothy Day converted to Catholicism and became an anomaly in.

A harsh and dreadful love: Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement by William D Miller (Book) Breaking bread: the Catholic Worker and the origin of Catholic radicalism in America by Mel Piehl (Book).

Opposition to the war in Vietnam. He is a co-founder of the Catholic Peace Fellowship and Pax Christi USA, a former member of the executive staff of Fellowship of Reconciliation and executive committee of Pax Christi USA and the War Resisters League and the Workers' Defense led the first protest against the Vietnam War, which started with only two people from the Catholic Worker.

Dorothy Day & the Catholic Worker Movement: Centenary Essays Phil Runkel et al., Editors Insightful collection of essays from a broad array of Catholic Worker movement voices. Breaking Bread: The Catholic Worker and the Origin of Catholic Radicalism in America. Mel Piehl A scholarly analysis of the first decades of Catholic Worker.

Two equally excellent books describe and analyze the history of the Catholic Worker Movement: William D. Miller, A Harsh and Dreadful Love: Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement () and Mel Piehl, Breaking Bread: The Catholic Worker and the Origin of Catholic Radicalism in America ().

His cousin John Carroll, the first Catholic bishop in America, wanted “to preserve inviolate forever, in our new empire, the great principle of religious freedom.” A new kind of immigrant. Catholics in revolutionary America tended to be wealthy, English speaking, and more focused on private devotions than on public displays of their faith.

THE CATHOLIC WORKER MOVEMENT. A Penny A Copy - Readings from the Catholic Worker – edited by Robert Elsberg, Tom Cornell & Jim Forest (updated version is best, paper back) Voices from the Catholic Worker – Rosalie Riegle.

Breaking Bread: The Catholic Worker and the Origin of Catholic Radicalism in America, by Mel Pieh. Catholic Radicalism: Phrased Essays For The Green Revolution, by Peter Maurin.

Published by Catholic Worker Books, introduction by Dorothy Day and foreword by David Mason. First edition of August Public domain: "The contents of this book are not copyrighted. The text may be reproduced by anyone in any desired form. She served as editor of The Catholic Worker newspaper, which she and Maurin founded, from until her death in Day was born in in Brooklyn, New York, and initially lived a bohemian life.

Dorothy Day was a radical in her political and social views because she was first a truly radical Catholic in her appropriation of the deepest currents in the Church’s ancient Tradition. 12 Mel Piehl, Breaking Bread: The Catholic Worker and the Origin of Catholic Radicalism in America, (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, ), 13 Charles Chatfield, "The Catholic Worker in the United States Peace Tradition," In American Catholic Pacifism: The Influence of Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement, edited by Anne.

Contributing to the ongoing excavation of the spiritual lifeworld of Dorothy Day—“the most significant, interesting, and influential person in the history of American Catholicism”—The Bread of the Strong offers compelling new insight into the history of the Catholic Worker movement, including the cross-pollination between American and Quebecois Catholicism and discourse about Christian.

The Catholic Worker newspaper is still sent to subscribers all around the world. The newspaper's "a penny a copy" price has never changed. The newspaper's "a penny a copy" price has never changed. In later years, Day wrote that it was Peter with his belief in personal action, voluntary poverty and pacifism who had given her "an instruction to a.

InDorothy Day, a journalist, bohemian socialist, and recent convert to Catholicism, met the French-born Peter Maurin. Maurin became Day's spiritual mentor. They collaborated in seeking ways to live the biblical injunctions to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, and to seek justice and peace through the founding of the Catholic Worker Movement.

Edited by John C. Seitz, Associate Professor, Theology Department, Fordham University. This series aims to contribute to the growing field of Catholic studies through the publication of books devoted to the historical and cultural study of Catholic practice in North America, from the colonial period to.

He is the founder of the Peter Claver Catholic Worker (South Bend, IN) and André House of Hospitality (Phoenix) and past director of the Catholic Peace Fellowship. Currently, he is finishing a book to be published in by Cascade Books, a division of Wipf and Stock Publishers—No Abiding City: Radicalism Against Americanism in Catholic.

The Catholic Worker in the United States peace tradition / Charles Chatfield ; The Radical origins of Catholic pacifism: Dorothy Day and the lyrical left druing World War I / Anne Klejment ; Catholic peace organizations and World War II / Patricia McNeal ; Conscription and the Catholic conscience in World War II / Patrick G.

Coy. Mel Piehl's Breaking Bread: The Catholic Worker and the Origin of Catholic Radidalism in America (Temple, Deeedber ) is an excellent, needed scholarly study of the Catholic Worker Movement in the context of American intellectual fiistory.

However, it hardly addresses The Catholic Worker from the perspective of journalism history. By using the example of the Catholic Worker, I construct a workable concept of a consensus social movement based on Quaker consensus and indigenous decision-making.

The new definition of consensus social movement brings theoretical strength as demonstrated in the illustration of the Catholic Worker. American Catholic pacifism: the influence of Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker movement / Published: () Breaking bread: the Catholic worker and the origin of Catholic radicalism in America / by: Piehl, Mel.

The book is impressive in its transnational focus and bilingual sources."-Una Cadegan, University of Dayton "The Bread of the Strong is a remarkable contribution to the literature on the history of American Catholicism and will long be an indispensable resource for gaining a deeper understanding of the Catholic Worker movement as a notable.Contributing to the ongoing excavation of the spiritual lifeworld of Dorothy Day--"the most significant, interesting, and influential person in the history of American Catholicism"--The Bread of the Strong offers compelling new insight into the history of the Catholic Worker movement, including the cross-pollination between American and Quebecois Catholicism and discourse about Christian.

English: Posthumously gathered into one volume, the Easy Essays of Peter Maurin are the intellectual DNA of the Catholic Worker Movement.

Drawing from a number of sources, including Catholic social teaching, radical and anarchist thought, the English distributist and the transatlantic agrarian movements, and many others, Maurin created a unique intellectual synthesis which drew the .

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